Superbugs - Green Planet Monitor

Superbugs - Green Planet Monitor

The most threatening, drug-resistant bacteria are resistant to three classes of antibiotics (as defined by their mode of action or bacterial target). The baddest bugs of the bunch are unbeatable. They can block, pump out, or degrade any antibiotic we’ve got to throw at them. “They just scoff” at drugs.

Interview With Eric Brown - American Academy of Microbiology

Interview With Eric Brown - American Academy of Microbiology

Why have so few new antibiotics been developed in the past few decades, and how can new tools be used to spur antibiotic discovery and development?

It’s alarming to me that modern drug discovery technologies have failed to yield new antibiotics but have been very successful in other therapeutic areas. I think it calls for some careful examination of the sources of failure. 

An innovative approach to taking on superbugs uses antagonism

An innovative approach to taking on superbugs uses antagonism

Researchers at McMaster’s Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research (IIDR) have identified a promising lead in the search for new antibiotics.

In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, they conclude that clomiphene – a widely used fertility drug – exhibits cryptic antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRSA).

Antibiotic resistance: the race to stop the 'silent tsunami' facing modern medicine

Antibiotic resistance: the race to stop the 'silent tsunami' facing modern medicine

Off the coast of California, nearly 20,000 feet below the surface of the Pacific Ocean, scientists from the San Diego Institute of Oceaneography are collecting samples of marine life from the ocean floor. At first glance, these small clumps of sediment may appear nothing special, but the micro-organisms which lie within may one day provide an answer to one of the most urgent issues in modern healthcare: the global antibiotic resistance pandemic.

IIDR presents promising scientist with prestigious award

IIDR presents promising scientist with prestigious award

The Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research would like to congratulate fourth-year student Kali Iyer on receiving the 2015 Michael Kamin Hart Memorial Scholarship for Undergraduate Research.

Twenty-one McMaster professors granted research funding

Twenty-one McMaster professors granted research funding

Three McMaster University professors have been named Canada Research Chairs.

The announcement was made Friday by the university and the federal ministry of state (science and technology).

Jonathan Bramson and Eric Brown were selected as Tier 1 Canada Research Chairs and will receive $1.4 million over seven years to help in their research work.

Globe and Mail - Defying Lab Conventions

Globe and Mail - Defying Lab Conventions

Medical science has been forced to get creative in the search for new antibiotic drugs. CBC News reports that researchers at McMaster University recently bypassed the traditional method of searching for antibiotics under optimal lab conditions in favour of finding antibacterial compounds under nutrient-poor conditions. 

Hope for those living with cystic fibrosis

Hope for those living with cystic fibrosis

Researchers at McMaster University have discovered this creative approach to
tackle antibiotic resistance to bacterial infections, a frequent complication of those with cystic
fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is the most common, fatal genetic disease affecting Canadian
children and young adults.

Canada's most prestigious scholarship awarded to eight McMaster students

Canada's most prestigious scholarship awarded to eight McMaster students

By the time she applied for graduate school, Soumaya Zlitni was a straight A-plus student who spoke three languages and had published in one of the most high profile journals in her field.

Now, at age 27, the PhD candidate in the Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences at McMaster University has been named one of the most promising young minds in the country.

McMaster researchers discover new antibacterial lead

McMaster researchers discover new antibacterial lead

Antibiotic resistance has been a significant problem for hospitals and health-care facilities for more than a decade. But despite the need for new treatment options, there have been only two new classes of antibiotics developed in the last 40 years.

Now a promising discovery by McMaster University researchers has revealed an ideal starting point to develop new interventions for resistant infections.

Scientists can now differentiate between healthy cells and cancer cells

Scientists can now differentiate between healthy cells and cancer cells

"McMaster is uniquely positioned for this discovery platform, and this was the missing ingredient - we have one of the best screening/robotic platforms, chemical libraries and expertise in professors Eric Brown and Gerry Wright, who have discovered molecules to combat infectious disease. Now we can combine it all. This team now aims to kill cancer."